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    Staying Industrious and Shunning Luxury: the Qing Emperor Jiaqing and the Art of His Time_4

    • Dates: 2017/01/07~2017/06/18
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Jiaqing (1760-1820) was the 15th son of the Qianlong emperor (1711-1799, r. 1736-1795), the 5th Qing emperor to rule over China. His full name was Aisin Gioro Yongyan, and he was also known by his temple name Renzong. He ruled for 25 years (1796-1820) under the reign name Jiaqing, pronounced "Saicungga Fengšen" in Manchu, meaning "possessive of good fortune and blessing" or "worthy of good fortune and blessing." 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Staying Industrious and Shunning Luxury: the Qing Emperor Jiaqing and the Art of His Time_3

    • Dates: 2017/01/07~2017/06/18
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Jiaqing (1760-1820) was the 15th son of the Qianlong emperor (1711-1799, r. 1736-1795), the 5th Qing emperor to rule over China. His full name was Aisin Gioro Yongyan, and he was also known by his temple name Renzong. He ruled for 25 years (1796-1820) under the reign name Jiaqing, pronounced "Saicungga Fengšen" in Manchu, meaning "possessive of good fortune and blessing" or "worthy of good fortune and blessing." 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Staying Industrious and Shunning Luxury: the Qing Emperor Jiaqing and the Art of His Time_2

    • Dates: 2017/01/07~2017/06/18
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Jiaqing (1760-1820) was the 15th son of the Qianlong emperor (1711-1799, r. 1736-1795), the 5th Qing emperor to rule over China. His full name was Aisin Gioro Yongyan, and he was also known by his temple name Renzong. He ruled for 25 years (1796-1820) under the reign name Jiaqing, pronounced "Saicungga Fengšen" in Manchu, meaning "possessive of good fortune and blessing" or "worthy of good fortune and blessing." 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Staying Industrious and Shunning Luxury: the Qing Emperor Jiaqing and the Art of His Time_1

    • Dates: 2017/01/07~2017/06/18
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Jiaqing (1760-1820) was the 15th son of the Qianlong emperor (1711-1799, r. 1736-1795), the 5th Qing emperor to rule over China. His full name was Aisin Gioro Yongyan, and he was also known by his temple name Renzong. He ruled for 25 years (1796-1820) under the reign name Jiaqing, pronounced "Saicungga Fengšen" in Manchu, meaning "possessive of good fortune and blessing" or "worthy of good fortune and blessing." 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Ancient Art of Writing: Selections from the History of Chinese Calligraphy

    • Dates: 2017/01/01~2017/03/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 204,206

    Exhibit

    To meet the need for recording information and ideas, unique forms of calligraphy (the art of writing) have been part of the Chinese cultural tradition through the ages. Naturally finding applications in daily life, calligraphy still serves as a continuous link between the past and the present. The development of calligraphy, long a subject of interest in Chinese culture, is the theme of this exhibit, which presents to the public selections from the National Palace Museum collection arranged in chronological order for a general overview. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Art and Aesthetics of Form: Selections from the History of Chinese Painting_2

    • Dates: 2017/01/01~2017/03/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210

    Exhibit

    The history of Chinese painting can be compared to a symphony. The styles and traditions in figure, landscape, and bird-and-flower painting formed themes that have continued to blend into a single piece of music. Painters, who make up this "orchestra," have composed and performed many movements and variations. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Art and Aesthetics of Form: Selections from the History of Chinese Painting_2

    • Dates: 2017/01/01~2017/03/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210

    Exhibit

    The history of Chinese painting can be compared to a symphony. The styles and traditions in figure, landscape, and bird-and-flower painting formed themes that have continued to blend into a single piece of music. Painters, who make up this "orchestra," have composed and performed many movements and variations. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Expressions of Humor in Chinese Painting and Calligraphy_2

    • Dates: 2017/01/01~2017/03/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 202,208

    Exhibit

    The Chinese term for humor is "youmo, " which appears in "The Nine Declarations: Embracing the Sands" from The Songs of Chu, an early Chinese classic of poetry: "With nothing but obscurity before my eyes, I find calm and complete silence. " In the second line, the binome for "you" and "mo" refers to "calm" and "silence, " respectively. Nowadays, however, Chinese dictionaries explain it as something that is amusing but having broader implications. So why was this ancient term used to translate the word "humor? " Earlier in the twentieth century, it was the renowned writer-translator Lin Yutang (1895-1976) who chose "youmo" as a phonetic rendering for "humor, " perhaps because no such corresponding term could be found in Chinese. He explained, "For those who are skilled at 'humor, ' their wit is invariably calmer and concealed. And for those who are skilled at judging 'humor, ' their appreciation lies particularly in a silent realization of the heart, which is often difficult to describe to others. Unlike crude jokes, the more 'calm' and 'silent' the humor is, the more marvelous it is."

    A person with a sense of humor therefore has the ability to both understand and employ humor, having a degree of intelligence and an open-minded attitude. Humor involves a keen power of observation and imagination using light-hearted and amusing forms of association and metaphor to convey life experiences, ways of thinking, or just things of playful interest. The kinds of humor are indeed many and include sharp words or other forms of self-deprecation, wit, teasing, and satire, often yielding unintended results ranging from a smile to outright laughter for the audience. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Expressions of Humor in Chinese Painting and Calligraphy_1

    • Dates: 2017/01/01~2017/03/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 202,208

    Exhibit

    The Chinese term for humor is "youmo, " which appears in "The Nine Declarations: Embracing the Sands" from The Songs of Chu, an early Chinese classic of poetry: "With nothing but obscurity before my eyes, I find calm and complete silence. " In the second line, the binome for "you" and "mo" refers to "calm" and "silence, " respectively. Nowadays, however, Chinese dictionaries explain it as something that is amusing but having broader implications. So why was this ancient term used to translate the word "humor? " Earlier in the twentieth century, it was the renowned writer-translator Lin Yutang (1895-1976) who chose "youmo" as a phonetic rendering for "humor, " perhaps because no such corresponding term could be found in Chinese. He explained, "For those who are skilled at 'humor, ' their wit is invariably calmer and concealed. And for those who are skilled at judging 'humor, ' their appreciation lies particularly in a silent realization of the heart, which is often difficult to describe to others. Unlike crude jokes, the more 'calm' and 'silent' the humor is, the more marvelous it is."

    A person with a sense of humor therefore has the ability to both understand and employ humor, having a degree of intelligence and an open-minded attitude. Humor involves a keen power of observation and imagination using light-hearted and amusing forms of association and metaphor to convey life experiences, ways of thinking, or just things of playful interest. The kinds of humor are indeed many and include sharp words or other forms of self-deprecation, wit, teasing, and satire, often yielding unintended results ranging from a smile to outright laughter for the audience. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Great Fortune for the Year of the Rooster: A Special Exhibition of Chicken Paintings from the Museum Collection

    • Dates: 2017/01/01~2017/03/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 212

    Exhibit

    The year 2017 corresponds to "dingyou" in the traditional cyclical calendar and the rooster in the Chinese zodiac, making it the "Year of the Rooster." In the Chinese language, the character for "chicken" is "ji," a homonym for "fortune." The first character in the binome for "rooster" is likewise a homonym for "merit" and "achievement," while the chicken’s "crest" stands for "official" and its "call" for "fame." As a result, the ancients often considered the chicken as an auspicious animal symbolizing “meritorious renown" and "promotion in rank and office."

    For millennia, people have raised chickens, making them an inseparable part of the economy with deep implications in life. Archaeologists, for example, have found the remains of chicken bones in ancient Chinese civilization. Evidence for the domestication of chickens dates no later than the Shang dynasty, as seen in excavations at the ruins of its last capital, Yin, located at modern Anyang City, Henan Province. Over thousands of years, the role of the chicken has evolved in thought and culture, at one point its egg serving as a symbol for the creation of all in Chinese genesis mythology. The chicken then became a spirit guardian capable of warding off evil and also the "Sun Bird" calling the sun to rise in the east. The form and habits of the chicken have been employed over the ages to express abstract beliefs and customs as well as other symbolic content, including ideas on how the cosmos operates. Afterwards, the rooster also became venerated as the "Bird of Virtues" for possessing the qualities of civil talent, military skill, courage, benevolence, and fidelity. Therefore, even in the worst of times, the rooster came to stand for faith and determination, being a model for good character among people. These descriptions trace a long and changing course of thought evolving from primitive religion to lofty cultural notions. 

    Exhibition Package Content

Last Update: 2017-09-20