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    Renowned Mountains and Great Rivers: Oversized Masterpiece Paintings in the Museum Collection

    • Dates: 2017/10/01~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 202

    Exhibition Package Content

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    National Treasure Diaporama—Qing dynasty Jadeite Cabbage

    • Dates: 2017/09/05~2017/10/31
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 102

    Exhibit

    Using new media art technology, this exhibit displays from every angle the details on the Jadeite Cabbage, an item in the NPM collection which fully demonstrates the ingenuity of Qing dynasty jade craftsmanship.

    Accompanied with spirited music in the background, the audio-visual preview allows audience members to appreciate the majesty of NPM treasures prior to stepping into the physical exhibition space. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Bravo at the NPM

    • Dates: 2017/08/01~2017/10/31
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 302

    Exhibit

    Chinese legend says that when a bear reaches the age of 500, it can transform into a myriad manifestations. Supernatural stories such as this may be difficult to believe today, but the bear as a symbol of physical strength has long and deep roots in the history of traditional Chinese thought.

    In conjunction with the 2017 Taipei Summer Universiade, the mascot for which is "Bravo," a Formosan black bear, the National Palace Museum is presenting a special display of artworks in its collection featuring bears. Examples include from the Wu to Western Jin period a bear-shaped celadon lamp and a dish supported by small bears most likely used as a lamp as well. In the Qing dynasty, there are also bear-shaped vessels in bronze and jade that demonstrate the Qianlong emperor's innovative reworking of tradition based on an ancient Han dynasty bronze bear in his collection. Also, a jade carving of a boy and a bear in embrace show the skillful use of black and white parts in the original mineral to suggest the two are dancing. These works in three different materials present fascinating moments that vie to bring out the combination of beauty and power for the bear in Chinese art. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations: Confucius in Painting, Calligraphy, and Print Through the Ages_3

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2017/09/28
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 202,208,212

    Exhibit

    In 1684, early during the Qing dynasty, the Kangxi emperor embarked on his first southern inspection tour and one his stops was Qufu, the hometown of Confucius (551-479 BCE), the most celebrated teacher and philosopher in Chinese history. While there, Kangxi presented a plaque in his own writing with "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations," which was hung in the Hall of Great Achievement at the Temple of Confucius. In the following year, the court ordered that rubbing copies be made of the plaque and presented to all temples in the country dedicated to Confucius. Thereafter, "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations" would become synonymous with Confucius. Today, the plaque for "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations" hanging at the Hall of Great Achievement in Tainan’s Temple of Confucius, the earliest one in Taiwan, is also its largest.

    The ancestors of Confucius descended from kings of the late Shang dynasty through nobility in the Song state, but Confucius himself was born in Lu. In Chinese, his surname is Kong (from the family name Zi), personal name Qiu, and style name Zhongni, with later generations referring to him as Kongzi ("Master Kong") or Kongfuzi ("Grand Master Kong"), from which his Latinized name derives. A philosopher and educator who lived during the Eastern Zhou dynasty, Confucius was an important scholar as well. He edited The Book of Poetry and The Book of Documents, added commentaries to The I Ching, established official rites and music, and compiled The Spring and Autumn Annals, having a hand in many of the classics that would become required reading among later generations preparing for the civil service examinations. As a result, Confucius came to exert an enormous influence in Chinese culture. And people even in Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Southeast Asia were impacted by his teachings, forming a sphere of Confucian culture. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations: Confucius in Painting, Calligraphy, and Print Through the Ages_2

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2017/09/28
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 202,208,212

    Exhibit

    In 1684, early during the Qing dynasty, the Kangxi emperor embarked on his first southern inspection tour and one his stops was Qufu, the hometown of Confucius (551-479 BCE), the most celebrated teacher and philosopher in Chinese history. While there, Kangxi presented a plaque in his own writing with "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations," which was hung in the Hall of Great Achievement at the Temple of Confucius. In the following year, the court ordered that rubbing copies be made of the plaque and presented to all temples in the country dedicated to Confucius. Thereafter, "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations" would become synonymous with Confucius. Today, the plaque for "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations" hanging at the Hall of Great Achievement in Tainan’s Temple of Confucius, the earliest one in Taiwan, is also its largest.

    The ancestors of Confucius descended from kings of the late Shang dynasty through nobility in the Song state, but Confucius himself was born in Lu. In Chinese, his surname is Kong (from the family name Zi), personal name Qiu, and style name Zhongni, with later generations referring to him as Kongzi ("Master Kong") or Kongfuzi ("Grand Master Kong"), from which his Latinized name derives. A philosopher and educator who lived during the Eastern Zhou dynasty, Confucius was an important scholar as well. He edited The Book of Poetry and The Book of Documents, added commentaries to The I Ching, established official rites and music, and compiled The Spring and Autumn Annals, having a hand in many of the classics that would become required reading among later generations preparing for the civil service examinations. As a result, Confucius came to exert an enormous influence in Chinese culture. And people even in Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Southeast Asia were impacted by his teachings, forming a sphere of Confucian culture. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations: Confucius in Painting, Calligraphy, and Print Through the Ages_1

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2017/09/28
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 202,208,212

    Exhibit

    In 1684, early during the Qing dynasty, the Kangxi emperor embarked on his first southern inspection tour and one his stops was Qufu, the hometown of Confucius (551-479 BCE), the most celebrated teacher and philosopher in Chinese history. While there, Kangxi presented a plaque in his own writing with "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations," which was hung in the Hall of Great Achievement at the Temple of Confucius. In the following year, the court ordered that rubbing copies be made of the plaque and presented to all temples in the country dedicated to Confucius. Thereafter, "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations" would become synonymous with Confucius. Today, the plaque for "Teacher Exemplar for a Myriad Generations" hanging at the Hall of Great Achievement in Tainan’s Temple of Confucius, the earliest one in Taiwan, is also its largest.

    The ancestors of Confucius descended from kings of the late Shang dynasty through nobility in the Song state, but Confucius himself was born in Lu. In Chinese, his surname is Kong (from the family name Zi), personal name Qiu, and style name Zhongni, with later generations referring to him as Kongzi ("Master Kong") or Kongfuzi ("Grand Master Kong"), from which his Latinized name derives. A philosopher and educator who lived during the Eastern Zhou dynasty, Confucius was an important scholar as well. He edited The Book of Poetry and The Book of Documents, added commentaries to The I Ching, established official rites and music, and compiled The Spring and Autumn Annals, having a hand in many of the classics that would become required reading among later generations preparing for the civil service examinations. As a result, Confucius came to exert an enormous influence in Chinese culture. And people even in Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Southeast Asia were impacted by his teachings, forming a sphere of Confucian culture. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Expressive Significance of Brush and Ink: Selections from the History of Chinese Calligraphy

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2017/09/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 204,206

    Exhibit

    To meet the need for recording information and ideas, unique forms of calligraphy (the art of writing) have been part of the Chinese cultural tradition through the ages. Naturally finding applications in daily life, calligraphy still serves as a continuous link between the past and the present. The development of calligraphy, long a subject of interest in Chinese culture, is the theme of this exhibit, which presents to the public selections from the National Palace Museum collection arranged in chronological order for a general overview. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Treasures from the National Palace Museum's Collection of Qing Dynasty Historical Documents_4

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2018/01/14
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Archival documents are not merely records produced by government agencies in the course of their administrative activities but also an important source of materials for the study of policy implementation and the forming of legal institutions. Since ancient times an administrative system has existed to safeguard national archives for auditing purposes and on account of their value as reference materials. In the Records of the Grand Historian (Shiji), it is noted that King Cheng of the Western Zhou dynasty commanded his officials to store important archives in golden cabinets, indicating that the archive system in China dates back more than 3,000 years. Successive dynasties continued the practice of preserving archives, leaving treasure troves of historical documents for posterity.

    Due to their high confidentiality, it was difficult for outsiders to have access to government documents. The Qing dynasty archives in the National Palace Museum’s collection include a variety of official documents from government agencies, resumes and biographies of officials, as well as veritable records, imperial diaries and edicts, and collection of official statutes. As they were considered of great importance in state affairs, such archives were carefully sealed and preserved by the Qing court. When the Manchus came to rule over China they adopted the archival management system of the previous Ming dynasty, and clear and strict regulations for archival practice, such as registering, copying, recalling, repairing, checking, and filing, were spelled out. For example, in consideration of their frequent use by officials and the resulting physical damages, the huge number of archival documents preserved in the Grand Council (Junji chu), which oversaw the highly confidential state affairs, was to be examined and repaired every few years. This provision gives us a sense of the importance the Qing court accorded to the management, maintenance, and preservation of national archives. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Treasures from the National Palace Museum's Collection of Qing Dynasty Historical Documents_3

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2018/01/14
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Archival documents are not merely records produced by government agencies in the course of their administrative activities but also an important source of materials for the study of policy implementation and the forming of legal institutions. Since ancient times an administrative system has existed to safeguard national archives for auditing purposes and on account of their value as reference materials. In the Records of the Grand Historian (Shiji), it is noted that King Cheng of the Western Zhou dynasty commanded his officials to store important archives in golden cabinets, indicating that the archive system in China dates back more than 3,000 years. Successive dynasties continued the practice of preserving archives, leaving treasure troves of historical documents for posterity.

    Due to their high confidentiality, it was difficult for outsiders to have access to government documents. The Qing dynasty archives in the National Palace Museum’s collection include a variety of official documents from government agencies, resumes and biographies of officials, as well as veritable records, imperial diaries and edicts, and collection of official statutes. As they were considered of great importance in state affairs, such archives were carefully sealed and preserved by the Qing court. When the Manchus came to rule over China they adopted the archival management system of the previous Ming dynasty, and clear and strict regulations for archival practice, such as registering, copying, recalling, repairing, checking, and filing, were spelled out. For example, in consideration of their frequent use by officials and the resulting physical damages, the huge number of archival documents preserved in the Grand Council (Junji chu), which oversaw the highly confidential state affairs, was to be examined and repaired every few years. This provision gives us a sense of the importance the Qing court accorded to the management, maintenance, and preservation of national archives. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Treasures from the National Palace Museum's Collection of Qing Dynasty Historical Documents_2

    • Dates: 2017/07/01~2018/01/14
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 103

    Exhibit

    Archival documents are not merely records produced by government agencies in the course of their administrative activities but also an important source of materials for the study of policy implementation and the forming of legal institutions. Since ancient times an administrative system has existed to safeguard national archives for auditing purposes and on account of their value as reference materials. In the Records of the Grand Historian (Shiji), it is noted that King Cheng of the Western Zhou dynasty commanded his officials to store important archives in golden cabinets, indicating that the archive system in China dates back more than 3,000 years. Successive dynasties continued the practice of preserving archives, leaving treasure troves of historical documents for posterity.

    Due to their high confidentiality, it was difficult for outsiders to have access to government documents. The Qing dynasty archives in the National Palace Museum’s collection include a variety of official documents from government agencies, resumes and biographies of officials, as well as veritable records, imperial diaries and edicts, and collection of official statutes. As they were considered of great importance in state affairs, such archives were carefully sealed and preserved by the Qing court. When the Manchus came to rule over China they adopted the archival management system of the previous Ming dynasty, and clear and strict regulations for archival practice, such as registering, copying, recalling, repairing, checking, and filing, were spelled out. For example, in consideration of their frequent use by officials and the resulting physical damages, the huge number of archival documents preserved in the Grand Council (Junji chu), which oversaw the highly confidential state affairs, was to be examined and repaired every few years. This provision gives us a sense of the importance the Qing court accorded to the management, maintenance, and preservation of national archives. 

    Exhibition Package Content

Last Update: 2017-09-20