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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_8

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_7

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_6

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_5

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_4

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_3

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_2

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

  • *

    The Making of a National Treasure: Select Masterpieces of Painting and Calligraphy in the Museum Collection_1

    • Dates: 2017/10/04~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 210,212

    Exhibit

    According to the definition given by the ROC’s Ministry of Culture in its “Cultural Heritage Preservation Act,” the works of painting and calligraphy in the collection of the National Palace Museum belong to the category of “Historic Artifacts (Antiquities).” This means they are art objects with cultural importance representing the work of particular groups of people from certain periods of time over the course of history. These objects are further divided and classified into three groups, from the most important one of “National Treasures” to that of “Significant Historic Artifacts (Significant Antiquities)” and finally “General Historic Artifacts (General Antiquities).”

    The task of ranking artifacts begins with the departments of each public institution in charge of their care. By the end of 2005, the National Palace Museum had already completed the initial classification of artifacts in its large collection. Afterwards, beginning in 2008, members of the Review Committee for Historic Artifacts at the Council for Cultural Affairs (the forerunner of the Ministry of Culture) worked in conjunction with painting and calligraphy exhibitions at the National Palace Museum to conduct inspections and written reviews confirming the works ranked as “National Treasures” and “Significant Historic Artifacts,” thereafter publicizing the results. As of July 2017, a total of 184 “National Treasure” works/sets and 352 “Significant Historic Artifact” works/sets in the category of painting and calligraphy have been approved and declared. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    The Expressive Significance of Brush and Ink: Selections from the History of Chinese Calligraphy

    • Dates: 2017/10/01~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 204,206

    Exhibit

    To meet the need for recording information and ideas, unique forms of calligraphy (the art of writing) have been part of the Chinese cultural tradition through the ages. Naturally finding applications in daily life, calligraphy still serves as a continuous link between the past and the present. The development of calligraphy, long a subject of interest in Chinese culture, is the theme of this exhibit, which presents to the public selections from the National Palace Museum collection arranged in chronological order for a general overview. 

    Exhibition Package Content

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    Of Considerable Appreciation: Painting and Calligraphy Donated and Entrusted to the Museum

    • Dates: 2017/10/01~2017/12/25
    • Gallery: Exhibition Area I 208

    Exhibit

    The National Palace Museum, since opening in 1965 at its new home in Taipei, has made considerable effort to expand the collection. Not only has the Museum over the years planned an acquisition budget used to make purchases of cultural artifacts to complement the holdings, it has also established a means by which to accept donations and entrustments. All those with cultural artifacts that meet the collection needs of the Museum are encouraged to donate or entrust them so that private treasures can come into public view to be shared in appreciation by society as a whole.

    The gallery here is devoted to a selection of some of the finest works donated and entrusted in the past to the National Palace Museum. Allowing people to know more about and study these exceptional additions to the collection, it gives the general public an opportunity to truly appreciate cultural heritage. This selection of works include moving depictions of animals fleeing in danger and distress, an early Qing impression of scenery at Mt. Lu, derivations of the Guo Xi landscape style in popular painting, and a landscape fan painting by a woman artist of the early Republican period. The National Palace Museum hereby expresses its appreciation to the people and organizations who have unselfishly donated and entrusted their precious works for the public good and, with this exhibition, encourages others to continue doing so and make it a museum truly of and for the people. 

    Exhibition Package Content

Last Update: 2017-09-20